Standby Virtual Desktops: The IT Insurance Policy For Mayhem

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By Michael Abboud

Allstate’s “mayhem” commercials underscore the need to protect yourself and your property from life’s unforeseen mishaps. What will happen to your business operations if a natural disaster strikes? Even more common, what will your IT team do when Jim in accounting unknowingly clicks on the latest ransomware strain and cripples the entire organization’s network? Or, Susan from marketing leaves her laptop in a taxi?

According to the 2017 Data Breach Year-End Review released by Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) and CyberScout, the number of U.S. data breach incidents recorded in 2017 totaled a record high of 1,579 breaches. The review reveals a drastic percent increase over the figures that were reported in

More than life’s everyday snafus, IT is beleaguered with natural disasters, outages, and disruptions related to cyber attacks — and they all can have a significant impact on the bottom-line.

In fact, according to cybersecurity experts Imperva, 59 percent of 170 security professionals who attended the RSA conference last year revealed that the downtime experienced due to lack of access to systems was the most consequential effect of a ransomware attack. Thirty-two percent of respondents indicated their company had been infected with ransomware, while 11% revealed it took longer than a week to regain access to their systems after an attack.

Do you have a business continuity plan? If an outage occurs, how fast can you be operational? Is the standby environment compliant with industry guidelines and regulations? Business continuity does not have to be expensive if you take advantage of standby virtual desktop options. They are a viable option at a fraction of the cost of owning and maintaining redundant equipment.

Standby virtual desktops are the answer

Traditional business continuity and disaster recovery approaches often include replicating existing IT infrastructure. Not only is this expensive but there are physical desktops and servers idling, which are costly to maintain, especially as your IT needs continue to evolve.

Moving towards managed virtual desktops delivered via a private cloud, provides a unique opportunity for organizations to reduce costs and provide remote access while supporting business continuity initiatives and mitigating the risk of downtime.

Standby virtual desktops are pre-configured and ready to go at a moment’s notice, allowing your team to remain “business as usual” during a sudden outage.

Eliminate physical redundancy and costs

Implementing standby virtual desktops is a seamless process. Virtual desktops are preconfigured and are readily available if and when an outage occurs, ensuring operational uptime.

Additionally, because desktops are monitored by a managed service provider over a secure network and supported by a Service Level Agreement (SLA), end users can expect reliable, high-availability. The physical infrastructure supporting virtual desktops are continuously monitored, typically hosted within an enterprise-grade datacenter, and have a high degree of redundancy.

Best of all, users are no longer tethered to any physical device, location or internet connection. Virtual desktops are accessible from any device, browser, and location providing an unapparelled level of mobility and flexibility without sacrificing performance, security, or compliance.

Overall, business continuity starts with the user. By utilizing standby virtual desktops, organizations are prepared with a true business continuity solution before a disaster or cyber attack strikes. According to industry analysts, it is not a matter of if but when. The question is, will you be prepared?

About the Author

Michael Abboud is the CEO and Founder of TetherView, a provider of private cloud environments including virtual desktops and virtual servers. He has over 20 years of business technology, healthcare, and real estate development experience – with a focus in moving businesses to the cloud and educating stakeholders on how to properly address cyber threats. Michael studied at NYU and St. Johns.